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2017_09_29
Pergola of The Club at NINE BRIDGES
         

Pergola of The Club at NINE BRIDGES

 

JOHO Architecture

Lee JeongHoon studied architecture and philosophy at Sungkyunkwan University before earning a master’s degree in architectural materials at Ecole Nationale Superieure d'Architecture de Nancy and an architects license (D.P.L.G.) at Ecole Nationale Superieure d'Architecture de Paris-La Villette. Lee JeongHoon founded JOHO Architecture in 2009. In 2010 he was the recipient of the Korean Young Architect Award, and in 2013 his firm was named a ‘Design Vanguard’ by the US architectural magazine Architectural Record, a title awarded to emerging architects. He was awarded the 2014 Fritz Hoger Architecture Award (Germany), the 2015 THE PLAN AWARD (Italy), and was also included among the Wallpaper* Architects’ Directory (UK). Interpreting architecture as a part of the humanities, JOHO Architecture bases their philosophy on creating a new identity and discourse in contemporary cities. In addition, architectural materials are set as a unit of ‘geo_metry’ and designs are developed through the grouping, addition and subtraction of these units. This ‘material_metry’ refers to the reinterpretation of a material’s meaning within the context of a site.


The Placeness of Animism and the Representation of Nature
Lee JeongHoon
(principal, JOHO Architecture)

 

Delphi was the shrine of the oracle. The shrine has Mount Parnassus rising behind and embraces the Gulf of Amphissa. The oracle of Apollo served to settle the differences between the small, scattered city states at the centre of the world. The shrine, which was built upon a rocky, cliff terrain that maintains a certain sense of hierarchy, maximized the natural energy of Parnassus. Delphi’s architectural logic and sense of placeness originates from the shaman teachings conducted at this sanctuary for the oracle. While Delphi’s notion of place was formed from the meaning and characteristics of its terrain, the Pergola of The Club at NINE BRIDES is a structure built on a location that honours an old sacred tree. The Chinese hackberry, which stood for roughly 400 years before the present golf course was constructed, consciously and unconsciously instated a place of animism and displacement that creates an unique architectural logic. In fact, the project’s critical purpose was to reconstruct the architecture sensitively in accordance with the sacred tree, which meant not only creating possible for harmony of an architectural space and nature but perceiving objects from a different perspective. This introduced the possibility of reconciliation between nature and architecture, which had until that point co-existed in an uncomfortable fashion. From the architect’s perspective, the project was not a simple expansion of functional space but rather a reconstruction of space by reestablishing relations with the sacred tree. In other words, the site did not need a Glass Pavilion with a new form but a symbol for animism and place.
The newly constructed Pavilion experimented with creating a space that respects nature as it is. For instance, Louis Kahn distinguished the composing elements of architectural space as served space and servant space. He interpreted the served space and auxiliary elements that compose architecture to differentiate between the main elements and the supporting elements. For this Pavilion, the intention was not to create spatial divisions through architectural elements, but to form space with natural elements as it is, merging served and servant spaces. To allow for this, a dual duct system that unifies structure and its facilities was devised. The inner duct is used for ventilation and wrapped with a 12mm thick steel frame to form the overall structure. The two ducts are covered with highly dense insulating material in between, to prevent dew condensation from indoor-outdoor temperature difference when operating cooling and heating systems.
To control this organic form finished with double curved surfaces, 6 main structures and 19 substructures were used. About 160 atypical, semi-tempered pair panes of glass were placed on the structure and roughly 280 curved panes of glass were applied on the flank. With the increased regulation on insulation, and in order to respond to the strong winds and ever-changing temperatures on Jeju Island, a more evolved, steadfast kind of glass was required. Due to budget and technical problems, about 440 glass panes of differing sizes were manufactured in a factory in China and assembled onto a locally manufactured structure. The inner structure produced at a factory near Seoul was disassembled into 80 pieces and shipped to Jeju Island for reassembly. The semi-tempered paired glass panes, with 140 different curvatures, were manufactured at the Chinese factory and assembled in Korea. This meant that the structure and glass panes needed to be produced according to precise set data specifications, and needed to undergo the additional task of comparing the 3D manufactured specifications to the final scanned specifications. This was a task that required sophistication, only allowing for a less than 10mm difference between the materials manufactured separately in Korea and China when they were to be reassembled at the site. For space utilization in all four seasons, daily ventilation and heating/cooling systems that responded to Jeju Island’s fluctuating temperatures needed to be resolved. The structure was mainly divided into six strands had a ventilation duct installed with 48 duct pipes to respond to the outside air temperature and to maintain a consistent indoor temperature. One element of particular note was that when only considering the wind volume in the duct, the size of the duct pipe could harm the aesthetics of the structure. To prevent this, an optimum conclusion was drawn by several adjustments to the structure’s size, number of duct pipes, and ventilation speed. Pergola of The Club at NINE BRIDES is a new formative experiment and symbolizes a space created by using space as it truly is, with structural and facility integration. This experiment respects the sacred tree and establishes a new space finished by situating architecture in nature, while keeping nature intact.

Pergola of The Club at NINE BRIDES is a structure built on a location that honours an old sacred tree.

From the architect’s perspective, the project was not a simple expansion of functional space but rather a reconstruction of space by reestablishing relations with the sacred tree.

The Chinese hackberry, which stood for roughly 400 years before the present golf course was constructed, consciously and unconsciously instated a place of animism and displacement that creates an unique architectural logic.

To control this organic form finished with double curved surfaces, 6 main structures and 19 substructures were used. About 160 atypical, semi-tempered pair panes of glass were placed on the structure and roughly 280 curved panes of glass were applied on the flank.

Pergola of The Club at NINE BRIDES is a new formative experiment and symbolizes a space created by using space as it truly is, with structural and facility integration.


Architect: JOHO Architecture (Lee JeongHoon)
Design team: Cho Junhee, Hong Bong-gwi, Jeong Moonyoung
Location: Seogwipo-si, Jeju-do, Korea
Programme: club house
Site area: 481,238㎡
Building area: 264.60㎡
Gross floor area: 320.79㎡
Building scope: B1, 1F
Height: 6.48m
Structure: steel frame structure
Exterior finishing: low-e pair glass, Jeju basalt
Structural engineer: TEO Engineering
CM: CJ E&C
Steel structure and Curtain wall and Glass: Iljin-Unisco
Construction: ILHO construction
Mechanical and electrical engineer: ACE Engineering
Landscape design: Garden in Forest
Construction supervision: Atelier 11
Architectural supervision: JOHO Architecture
Design period: Nov. 2015 ? May 2016
Construction period: Dec. 2016 ? Aug. 2017
Client: CJ E&C. The Club at NINE BRIDGES

edited by Kong Eulchae | photographed by Efrain Mendez | materials provided by JOHO Architecture

 
 
tag.  Jeju , Pavilion , Glass , JOHO Architecture
       
no.599 (2017.October) 
 
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