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2017_10_26
Rainbowhouse for children
         

Rainbowhouse for children


The Rainbow house is a home for three generations living together on a long, east- west stretched piece of land. It’s a home for the mom and son and the daughter and son-in law with their two children. Since the family members have been living separately for quite a long time, we had to divide the space appropriately considering the different lifestyles. 

The central orientation of the courtyard divides the house on the first floor into two separate parts. On the West side the mother and son are living, while the east side is the part for the daughter, son-in-law and their two children. This separation on the first floor allows them to have some privacy. The corridor on the second floor creates a connection between these two parts and allows the family members to share some mutual space together. With the family members being faithful to their needs and respecting and embracing each other’s life, this family resembles a rainbow. They are a rainbow-like family that lives in a house that resembles this family.

It’s a house that begins at the courtyard and is completed through the corridor on the second floor. Usually a house doesn’t start from the courtyard; it usually starts from the porch and ends at the veranda or the bathroom.

The Rainbow House resembles a rainbow.  Not only by its shape but also for the symbolic meaning it has. The house, just like a rainbow, stands for a warm feeling and giving hope to people. At the center of the first floor we planned a vacant space with stairs that leads up at the border to create a space to hide away from the street view. When you look up while climbing this stairs you can see the Rainbow yard. This yard is a well-hidden place on the second Floor of the house at the connection zone between the two sides. It is orientated between the multipurpose room and the library. The parking lot and the yard are outside spaces designed to allow both houses to be loosely and warmly connected.The Rainbow House is a small house that appears as a big house. In order to overcome the level difference with the street we made use of split-levels at the inside and at the outside of the house. This use of split-levels creates an open feeling, which makes the house seems bigger.

This use of split-level is especially used at the part where the mom and son are living. Since they are expected to have a lot of visitors, they proposed a space that is naturally connected to smooth the communication. To realize this request we made use of the split-level and created several openings that penetrate the house vertically. These openings in the walls are planned for the children and visitors who are not familiar with the house. The stairway, which turns around the center wall in the house, is designed in a way that not both sides are completely connected to the wall. There is a small gap at one side of the stairs, which allows you to take a peek at the lower floor.

At the space for the daughter, son-in-law and their children the kitchen is a half- rise room that allows an open view at the living room. The kitchen creates a deep sense of space. The stairway has a centered position that emphasizes the accessibility of each room and makes people feel a certain sense of spaciousness. 

The rainbow house has a robust exterior appearance with at its center a concave rainbow courtyard dividing the different generations. This concave courtyard is designed in a way that people on the street can’t see what’s happening at this courtyard. So when young guests from the local children’s center spend some time at this house they would be free from the external gazes. The courtyard is like a cozy space that is encountered through the entrance of a temple. 

 A symbolized tree is placed at the courtyard. This yard is designed to allow the people to gather and spend some quality time together. A boundary wall at the end of this yard functions as a windscreen and blocks the view to obtain a private, warm space.





Architect: KDDH Architects

Location: Yangcheong-ri, Ochang-eup, Cheongwon-gu, Cheongju-si, Chungcheongbuk-do, Korea

Programme: housing

Site area: 698.2㎡ 

Building area: 169.7㎡

Gross floor area: 186.57㎡ 

Building scope: 2F 

Parking: 2 

Height: 8.85m

Building to land ratio: 24.31%

Floor area ratio: 26.72%

Structure: reinforced Concrete 

Exterior finishing: staco flex, steel sheet

Interior finishing: wall paper, wood, tile 

Design period: Sep. 2015 - Feb. 2016

Construction period: May 2016 - Feb. 2017


materials provided by KDDH Architects



 
 
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